Tag Archives: finding work

I hope you’ve had a great week…

I’m heading into a busy season of travel and speaking for the next 4-6 weeks, and remind myself it’s a privilege when explaining to the girls why Mommy has to leave again for a few days.

They fuss, question, and then get through it fine. Between my assistant/nanny and my all-star husband, the household goes on so I can get up and go where doors have opened.

Having clarity on our calling is so important isn’t it? Knowing WHY we do what we do, and having a sense of our divine assignment, helps us plow through the challenges, obstacles, and scheduling.

When I was single in my 20’s and 30’s, working long hours for little pay, wondering how I’d get from the day job to the life-calling job, it often felt like a mix of random experimenting and paying the bills.

I look back now, with many more years in the bag and realize…it all feels the same.

Yes there are moments of reward, job promotions, the big transfer to NYC and landing my first book deal. But most of the time, from sun up to sun down, it all feels the same.

What is this “same?”

It’s the daily routines, the getting up, going to bed and everything in between. It’s lingering questions like…

Am I doing enough to make a mark? To be memorable? To get ahead?

We wonder why fulfillment is often elusive, sporadic, or just not as fulfilling as we thought it would be.

Which is why PURPOSE matters. Purpose answers the question, “Why?” Why am I doing any of this anyway? Why did God put me here at this job, with these people, doing these things?

If we ponder, pray, and keep moving, we CAN find our purpose, then let it be the GPS telling us where to turn and how to arrive at destinations worth the drive.

After years of doing “Discover Your Purpose” workshops, I’ll soon be launching an online course I’m so excited about bringing to you, with modules, tools, and inspiration to help you know, with conviction, why you’re here.

One way to get ready for these discoveries is by asking God to reveal His heart and intentions for your life. Then watch for signs and signals about what you love most, where your impact occurs for others, and the dreams in your heart intended to accompany your purpose journey.

It does feel long and boring at times, but over time, we realize these days are the best days, and enjoying the “now” prepares us for what comes next.

Let’s keep in touch as your journey of purpose continues.

I’m cheering you on as you head into this weekend…

 


Last week I posted on “endings”, which led to further pondering on “ways to leave.”

Leaving is a part of life.  We leave jobs, cities, organizations, and sadly at times, even people.

There is an art to leaving, and learning it well can create possibilities and doors left open vs. slamming shut.

Within a year of my Deloitte job transfer from Tulsa to New York City, I got a job offer “too good to refuse” from the top PR Firm in the city.  It felt a bit premature to leave, but would I be a fool if I didn’t take it?

Rather than hide considerations and processing from my bosses, I decided to tell them openly and let them weigh in.  It felt a bit awkward, but immediately it positioned us as collaborators vs. opponents.

I let them in on my thinking which included financial, positional, and opportunity considerations.  Both bosses understood and by the time we were done discussing over a period of a week or more, everyone agreed it was an offer not to refuse.

Within the first six months at the PR Firm the economy took a dive and my role was in peril, something I was unaware of when one of my Deloitte bosses took me to lunch two weeks prior to my layoff, just to catch up. 

Now I was calling him asking if he might consider me for an opening he’d mentioned. Within just two weeks I was back at Deloitte in a better position with higher pay.

This experience was a great reminder of something I’ve learned many times since, on both ends of similar deliberations.  The way we leave matters.  It contributes to our “brand” and has the potential to involve and engage those we’re leaving or can leave them out in the cold with negativity that’s tough to break.

The world is small and relationships are more closely networked than you might imagine.  None of us can risk offending or disregarding anyone when we leave, even when a departure is logical or justified.

Leave well, carefully, and treat those you’re leaving like YOU would want to be left.  It’s a golden opportunity to make a lasting impression that keeps the door from slamming behind you on the way out.  “I hate that she’s leaving and sure hope I see her again,” is always my goal.


This time of year Ron and I get flooded with requests for help in finding a job.  New grads are hitting the “real-life” job market while others are in some sort of job transition.

I responded to one inquiry recently, with what I called a “mentoring moment,” designed to help her be more successful in looking for work.  I believe these tips are crucial when asking people for ideas, connections, and assistance in any job search.  What follows is my email in response to her inquiry, with suggestions that can help anyone looking for a job.

Dear Shari (name is changed)

Wow, it’s hard to believe you are graduating already, seems like just yesterday you were starting college.  We are so proud of you and the ways you have grown.  Glad you wrote and happy to offer some thoughts as you search for “marketplace work.”

“Marketplace” is an extremely broad and somewhat vague category.  We need to know your specific interests within that category:

  • What is your exact degree?
  • How might you envision yourself using it?
  • What specific types of work do you enjoy most?

Have you read my book?  It would be perfect timing now if not.  Dive into the exercises, write a purpose statement for your life, get specific about people you need to help you in the next stage of your life and journey.  Consider going through my podcast series too, “Lunch with Lynette” and find those ideas that are especially useful at this juncture.  My resources are simply one of many.  Learn everything, be hungry for mentoring and find tools that can help you get more DEFINITION and SPECIFICITY around your interests and goals.

Ron and I are both well-connected to many people, companies, etc., but it’s difficult to help when someone comes with vague needs.  People who are well-connected and knowledgeable will not typically respond to that type of inquiry (people wonder why they don’t get a response, it’s often because they weren’t specific.)  If you can learn to be very specific such as, “I’m interested in XYZ company because I saw they have an opening for XYZ position, do you know of anyone at that company or can you help me tailor my resume for that position?” anyone with expertise or connections will be glad to assist you.

  • Do research on companies in cities where you’re open to living,
  • Find specific job openings that appeal
  • Do research on these jobs, understand the qualifications
  • Figure out how to tell your story in a way that aligns with these openings
  • Work with your college placement office
  • Work hard at networking with people you know from church, your school, and family, those who can help you gain an interview within these companies
  • Start targeting specific companies and jobs vs. just looking at your future as “I want to be in the marketplace”

Newspapers have classified ads, temp agencies have jobs and in many cases these temp assignments turn into permanent jobs (this is how I got my first job out of college as well as many summer jobs.)  Find out which temp agencies are in your area, go in and apply.

You are gifted, qualified, talented, with a wonderful heart and personality.  You can find a great job that God has already gone before you to prepare.  It’s going to take work, research, preparation.  No one will hand you an easy path (I know you know this, I’m stating the obvious), but by following these suggestions you can find your first job and enjoy it, knowing you did your work and got the prize!

Hope this is helpful, bless you and we are praying over all of this with you….
Lynette